Mexicans: Why they’re so fresh


In today’s Mexican food section we have the thirst quenching , smile widening ,comfort food(drink actually)  “AGUAS FRESCAS” =  translated  Fresh waters.  “Aguas Frescas” are a very popular drink found in Mexico. “Aguas Frescas” can  easily be found in  all sorts of  restaurants or at vendor stands in Mexico. Truly there is  never a wrong moment for this delicious beverage. Proud to hold a place in Mexican homes(in Mexico & abroad), an essential part celebrations, & even sold after mass by the parishioners at some churches….  Just like a nice cold bottle of pop is a match made in heaven for a delicious order of burger & fries, no  drink gets along better with Mexican food than aguas frescas. Aguas frescas are know for not only their refreshing flavor & eye catching color, but also the famous large pitcher/jugs in which they  are made & stored in. Aguas frescas  are sold both in cups & for extra fun &  for more of a quirkiness factor, in plastic bags tied up with a straw inside.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aguas_frescas

Aguas frescas (Spanish for “fresh (cold) waters”) are a combination of either fruits, cereals, or seeds, and sugar and water, blended together to make a refreshing beverage. Although they originated and are most common in Mexico, aguas frescas have also become popular in Central America, the Caribbean, and the United States. Some of the most popular flavors include agua de tamarindo (made with tamarind pods), agua de jamaica (made with roselle), and agua de horchata (usually made with rice and cinnamon).

It is possible that from these aguas frescas the production of bottled fruit sodas such as Jarritos arose. In Mexico the beverage is often sold by street vendors, but in many cases fine Mexican restaurants will have a good selection of Aguas Frescas available.

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Aguas frescas come in all kinds of flavors :

WATERMELON

STRAWBERRY

RICE & CINNAMON

ALFALFA

DRIED HIBISCUS FLOWERS

TAMARIND

PINEAPPLE

LIME

GUAVA

& the list goes on & on!

In case U are wondering  =P Jamaica (hibiscus tea) is my favorite! Give me some & I’ll be in a good mood/ totally agreeable all day long =)

You can find “Aguas Frescas”   here in the U.S. in :  Mexican restaurants, or you can look for “Agua Fresca” shops too, they’re kinda like  a  smoothie shop only better =D  You can sometimes buy a nice tall fresh glass of “agua fresca” in your local Hispanic supermarket.

Although, I highly recommend that you enjoy a freshly made glass of this yummy treat, just in case you can’t get your hands on some of this awesome elixir freshly brewed… Worry not! You can buy instant “Agua Frescas” powder or canned drinks(also found in larger carton)in your local supermarket in the International foods isle, refrigerated  or you can also try online.  I love having these on hand for convenience.

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For more Aguas frescas info, recipes & products visit

http://www.mexgrocer.com/mexcocina-sep4.html

You can shop @ Superior Grocers

http://www.superiorgrocers.com/

http://www.klass.com/home.html

Stater Bros

Food 4 Less

Gigante Supermarkets

Just to name a few, don’t be shy. Go ahead & explore, there are many Mexican grocers through out =D


AGUAS FRESCAS RECIPES

from Foodnetwork.com

Ingredients

  • 1 large cantaloupe or half a watermelon, seeded and diced (about 3 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 to 3 limes, juiced

Directions

This and other similar fruit drinks, which translate literally as “fresh water,” are served all over Mexico and they’re a cinch to replicate at home. The key is to strain the pulpy fruit to make a clearer liquid. Instead of melon, you could use strawberries, pineapple, or mango — any fruit that is soft enough to puree.

Puree cantaloupe and pour through a fine sieve to eliminate pulp. In a pitcher, mix strained fruit puree with water and season with sugar and lime juice, to taste.

FROM MEXICANGROCER.COM

Agua de Tamarindo (Tamarind-flavored Water)

Tamarinds are used frequently in both Thai and Indian cooking. In Mexico they’re hugely popular and are regularly used to make aguas dulces, or sweet waters. They’re also used to make dulces de tamarindo, or tamarind candies. The pods of the tamarind tree are used in this delicious, unique drink. This recipe takes about an hour to prepare and another hour or so to chill. It makes a half gallon. Or, to buy a quick and easy mix for Agua de Tamarindo at MexGrocer click here at,Agua de Tamarindo.

20 tamarindo pods(three packages)
2 quarts water
1 1/2 cups sugar (or to taste)

Peel the tamarindo pods, removing the veins that run along the sides. Leave the seeds.

In medium saucepan, bring one quart water to a boil. Add peeled tamarindo pods. Boil over high heat for approximately 15 minutes, or until the pulp is soft.

Remove from heat and let cool until the pulp is ready to handle. Remove seeds from pulp and discard, along with any remaining bits of peel. Empty the saucepan into a blender. Add sugar and blend until liquified. Run the mixture through a strainer, discarding extra pulp. Pour into a pitcher and mix with remaining quart of water. Chill thoroughly before serving. Pour into tall, ice-filled glasses and serve.

FROM SIMPLE RECIPES.COM

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pound diced seedless or seeded watermelon (without rind), about 3-4 cups
  • 8 ounces strawberries, stems removed (about a pint)
  • 1 Tbsp lemon or lime juice
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup cold water
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WHAT A CIRCUS!


Grab a front row seat cuz life’s a totally amazing  three ring spectacle!

In today’s music section we have = ARTIST- Singer/Actress : EIZA GONZALEZ , SONG: TU CIRCO(YOUR CIRCUS)

This song is off the “Lola Erase una Vez” (Lola Once upon a Time) Original Soundtrack. Sorry there’s no official MV for this, so I got the next best thing a fan vid. Small little tidbit of cultural info “Tu Circo se acabo” is a popular saying in Mexican Spanish, meaning : Your Circus has come to and end” a.k.a.  your fun is over.

LYRICS

(Announcer)Come on by, Stop on by! Don’t let them tell you about it, they could be lying.  Come see  first hand the one who lost his love for being a dope.

You  who thought I would die

When I saw you with a new mannequin

You  who thought I was going to mourn

And just look at me casually wandering this bar

You thought  that when u  said goodbye

I was going to go into a deep depression

Truth be told , you’re not all that for me to to be getting so emotional

You who thought I’d miss you

Now you pursue me non stop

You who bet that I would break, now come crawling at my feet

Like a gum without any flavor left my heart spit ya out

Please, Don’t look for me anymore

On my part, it’s all over

It was you who said goodbye

And now you come asking for my forgiveness

It was you who said goodbye

And now you come asking for my forgiveness

There’s no more engaments or performances

It’s the end of your Circus

There’s no more engagements or performances

It’s the end of your Circus

Yea, yea! It’s the end of your circus

Your clown like antics don’t make me laugh

I think it best for you to leave

I neither hold grudges against you, nor hallucinate about you

But understand this, there is nothing left

Like a gum without any flavor left my heart spit ya out

Please, Don’t look for me anymore

On my part, it’s all over

It was you who said goodbye

And now you come asking for my forgiveness

It was you who said goodbye

And now you come asking for my forgiveness

There’s no more engaments or performances

It’s the end of your Circus

There’s no more engagements or performances

It’s the end of your Circus

It’s over now

(Announcer)  “Come on by, come on by! Buy your ticket & Don’t miss out!  Come see the shattered love show!”

It was you who said goodbye

And now you come asking  for my forgiveness

It was you who said goodbye

And now you come asking for my forgiveness

There’s no more engaments or performances

It’s the end of your Circus

There’s no more engagements or performances

It’s the end of your Circus

YEA YEA, YOUR CIRCUS IS OVER, YO-UR CIR-CUS IS OVER YEAAA!  x2

Flying Mexicans: Crazy Cool Culture


WATCHING THIS VIDEO ALL I CAN SAY IS WOW!

TOO FREAKING AMAZING!

Seriously,  I look at these beautiful traditions, the feat these men undertake every time they perform & it’s mind boggling. They’re so brave!


 

Gotta Love these guys, so brave first of all! And so awesome for being so dedicated and passionate about staying true to their roots. Also, for  wanting to share tradition with us all , which we should not miss out out &  how cool are the for passing it on?!!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Totonacs of Papantla, Veracruz performing the “voladores” ritual

The Danza de los Voladores de Papantla (Dance of Papantla’s flyers) is a ritualistic dance in Veracruz, Mexico performed by the Totonac Indians and Olmeca Indians. Five men, each representing the five elements of the indigenous world climb atop a pole, one of them stays on the pole playing a flute and dancing while the remaining four descend the pole with a rope tied by one of their feet. The rope unwraps itself 13 times for each of the four flyers, symbolizing the 52 weeks of the year.

This dance is thought to be the vestige of a pre-Hispanic volador ritual common not only in ancient Veracruz but in western Mexico as well.[1]

Origins

According to legend, a long drought covered the Earth so five men decided to send Xipe Totec, the God of fertility a message, asking them for the rain to return. They went to the forest and looked for the straightest tree, cut it, and took it back to their town. They removed all branches and placed it on the ground, then dressed themselves as feet/birds and descended flying attempting to grab their God’s attention.