Mexican Food: Machacado con Huevo


It’s that time again! Time for some delicious Mexican gastronomy!  Today’s dish is  know as  “Machacado con Huevo”, “Machaca con Huevo”, or simply “Machaca” = Eggs & Mash/ shredded with eggs. Pronounced something like  : mah-chah-kah-doh-kohn-oo-eh-boh.  The verb “Machacar” means to mash/grind.

This is a typical dish from Monterrey &  is “said to have originated in the town of Ciénega de Flores, about an hour north of MonterreyMexico.” – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machacado_con_huevo

This yummy & easy recipe makes use of  eggs & cured, dried meat. In other words beef jerky, but not the kind you buy at the 7 eleven, the one you buy at the butcher shop.  Although, hmm who knows?  Maybe if you’re  in a bind the 7eleven jerky could work?  lol  Maybe not =S   The original dish, traditionally would call for beef jerky, since people in the olden days use to swear by cured meats due to the convenience and shelf life.  Variations do exist , some use shredded beef instead.  I’ve seen my mom make this with “carne seca” (meaning dehydrated meat) she’s brought home from Mex,  meat like this: http://www.vtdviaje.com.mx/vtd/images/stories/Nuevo_Leon/Gusto_Gourmet_Nuevo_Leon/carne-seca.jpg & shredded beef, so both ways.

In the first video they have a pre-machado mix, which I had never seen, actually…  But in the end it’s up to what’s to your liking & or convenience  =) You can look for “carne seca”  in packages in your local Mexican, Latin American Supermarket.  Like this for example: http://loscorrales.net/products.htm This is just me, but I think the dish is neatest when you can start  with whole pieces of “carne seca” from the butcher shop.

 

*Notice how the first recipe adds a tomato sauce, but in the  succedent recipes the tomatoes are diced and added. See there are many variations, just learn the basics and make the recipe your own.

This chef notes that, the dish is typically eaten with flour tortillas, but is equally tasty with corn tortillas.

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Sing a long Friday : “Xochipitzahuatl” (traditional Mexican song)


So many beautiful things about our cultures, things that are worth: admiring, learning about and most of all  keeping alive & thriving. One of those things most definitely has to be language. In Paraguay 88% of the population speaks Guarani along with Spanish.  In Taiwan though most people speak Mandarin and the older generations are most knowledgeable when it comes to traditional Taiwanese, and though Taiwanes youngsters outside of Taiwan are a little sketchy on it,  native Taiwanese kids are still taught about it (traditional Taiwanese) and understand it a bit even if they don’t practice it as often as say their grandparents, or so I’ve heard.  So, I listen to different kinds of music and there’s this Taiwanese pop girl group I like. I totally fell in love with one of the songs off  their latest album, and  I especially  thought  it was super cool when I  heard the group recorded that particular song not in main stream Mandarin but instead in traditional Taiwanese.  This is our heritage ,our vestige…. We should take pride in these beautiful treasures. That is why in today’s post I’d like to share a traditional Mexican song. This post as they all are is  for everyone, but especially those who’d like to learn  a short little something in Nahuatl(aka Aztec).  The song is called “Xochipitzahuatl” pronounced: soh-chee-pee-tzah-hoo-wah-tahl, meaning: little flower.  This song is AKA “Flor Menudita” in Spanish.

Are these kids too COOL or what?! And such talent =D Plus they look so cute in their outfits.

It’s just a few short lines, but it something cool you can learn &   impress your friends with. Show ’em you can sing in Nahuatl!

This song is usually sung at weddings  in the Huasteca region of Mexico. From what I’ve been able to research, it is sometimes danced rather than sung. The  song is preformed for the Virgin of Guadalupe as away of asking for the event to be blessed. I’m not incredibly familiar with this song, so not sure how long the song actually is . The girls in the first vid seem to be singing more lyrics than the guy in the 2nd vid =S   Went on a hunt for the lyrics online and can not for the life of me find proper lyrics. There’s very little info online, could be that is due to the fact that the song is often know as a dance rather than a piece that is sung. I can only get little excerpts here & there, plus everyone’s version differs =(

Still so glad to see people taking pride in their roots and passing them on especially youngsters. =)  Hope you ENJOY GUYS!!

Mexican Talent in the Performing Arts


Videos: Pianist Salvador Rodriguez  Aldrete from Nayarit.  Professional musician of 30 years. As a  professor of music he is currently heading the “Elemental Music” & “Oratory Principals”  workshops  at the Catholic University of Puerto Vallarta.

This ballet version of the Jarabe Tapatio was a performance that took place as part of the concert celebrating  Mr. Rodriguez’s  30 yr career featuring ballerina Ruth Marcela Perez Contreras.

http://www.pianistasalvatore.com/Enlaces.html

Mexican Food : The treat known as Amaranto


Amaranto is a traditional Mexican candy also know as “Alegría” (happiness, joy, cheer).  A treat who’s ingredients &  manufacturing process have a long standing  history. The candy’s main ingredient is the intensely nutritious grain knows as amaranth, it is so nutritious than it surpass both rice & wheat. Amaranth was a staple food of the Aztecs.  Alegría candy bars contain : nuts, pepitas(pumpkin seeds), rasins, & the amaranth grain  which are “glued” together with pilloncillo(a type of unrefined sugar that usually comes in cones, known to some as “Mexican brown sugar”)

MORE INFO :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepita

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panela

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaranth

Cool Aztec Names


I’d been dying to do a post like this, thought it’d be super fun to share with the readers! I had already done a post on the meanings of  last names in Spanish, so I went in search of names in Mexican indigenous languages next.   I searched the web, and I found this cool list of Aztec/Mayan names. Sorry if there are any discrepancies, feel free to add your two cents on the subject if you’d like. You can do so by visiting the comments section.  I’m learning along the way too =)  Ok, so  a million thanks to my source all credit goes to them.  I only excerpted some names & tanslated their meaning. You can find the complete list by following the link  =D

Source : http://mx.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070317122716AAbQUdd

TLEXOCHITL= Fire flower

METZTLI / MEXTLI= Moon

CUAUHTÉMOC = descending eagle

TONALLI= Day, energy, warmth

TOPILTZIN= our dear little boy, our prince

TLAZOHTZIN= he who is loved

IZTACOYOTL= white coyote

TEOXIHUITL = Turquoise divinity, beautiful one

EHÉCATL = Wind

ATLANXOCHITL= The most beautiful flower of the sea.

CEYAOTL = Warrior

CITLALTONAC = Dazzling star

CITLALTZIN = little star

QUIAHUITL = rain

TLEYOTL = heart of fire

YAOCIHUATL= woman warrior

There are so many gorgeous and inspiring names, but if I had to pick just one… I guess I’d like to be named: QUIAHUITL( rain) because I adore the rain, it’s so romantic. Plus I’m from So Cal where we don’t get that much rain, so it’s all the more precious to me . Then again, CITLALTZIN (little star) is such a cute and pretty name too. But with a name like TEOXIHUITL (Turquoise divinity, beautiful one) wow who wouldn’t feel like a godess?!  Lol So super hard to choose, all the names rock!

Celebrated Mexican Journalist Germán Dehesa Passes away


Mexico grieves the loss of writer, journalist, playwright,  German Dehesa (1944-2010) . He first disclosed his battle with cancer in his column  back in August of this year. He promised his readers to write for as long as his illness would allow. He passed Thursday, Sept 2. He is survived by his wife and four children.

ABOUT MR. DEHESA:

He studied both chemical engineering and Hispanic literature at the National Autonomous University of Mexico better know as UNAM, he worked as a professor there as well for over 25 years. In 2008 he recieved the Don Quixote award for Journalism awarded to him by Juan Carlos I King of Spain. On August 11 of this year was recognized as a  “Distinguished Citizen” by the Mexico city government..

He was a writer with the “Reforma” group, his work was also published in about 50 other publications nationwide. He became famous due to his masterful ability to play & create with the Spanish language. His dynamic writing style was informative and entertaining, as he wrote by making use of curious and original idioms,expressions found in Mexican Spanish. The employment of  news spellings and double entendres, were  some of the neat tricks he used to create works of humor & genius. He mixed both the critical with the mundane and invited everyone to put their analytical caps on. His column”The Angel’s Gazzete” became famous as it was a work elaborated in colloquial and simple language. Here he shared anecdotes from his personal experiences, talked about current events, experiences common to everyone, along with the expression of his political and critical thought. The column was especially acclaimed for its mini column within the column, a section entitled “How’d You Sleep last night?” In which he called out authorities, expressing grievance, &  dissatisfaction towards ineffective politicians and other lacking posts. Beginning in 06′ the “How’d You Sleep Last Night?” column was mostly dedicated to Arturo Montiel.

He joined the ESPN team as a commentator earlier this year on the show  “Capitanes de ESPN”  along side Jose Ramon Fernandez, Rafael Puente, Hector Huerta. For his brilliant reflections and commentary on Mexican society Mr. Dehesa will continue to be admired and celebrated.

Books by Mr. Dehesa :

  • Adiós a las trampas  = Goodbye to traps
  • La familia (y otras demoliciones)= The Family (and other demolitions)
  • ¡Qué modos!: usos y costumbres Tenochcas
  • ¿Cómo nos arreglamos? Prontuario de la corrupción de México
  • Las nuevas aventuras de El Principito
  • No basta ser padre = It’s not enough to be a father

Plays:

  • Tapadeus III
  • El gabinete de Belem
  • Borges con música
  • El pórtico de las palomas
Other related Links
Must Read PDF: “German Dehesa, Mexico and the Craft of Writing”  Analysis and translation of some of his work. (In English)

http://www.pucpr.edu/hz/088.pdf

Blog post about his life & passing in English

http://dailygrail.com/blogs/red-pill-junkie/2010/9/RIP-German-Dehesa-1944-2010